Albums (43)

  • WestvleterenAbbey

    WestvleterenAbbey

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    The abbey at Westvleteren, Belgium, St. Sixtus' Abbey, is one of the six Trappist abbeys in Belgium. What is unique about Westvleteren is that they do not distribute their beers like the other Trappist abbeys. Other than a single distribution in the US in 2012 (a fund raiser for a new roof), the only way to get this beer is to go to the abbey. The gift shop sells single six-packs, limit two, for €15-€20 depending on the beer. Tim and Beth made a side trip to the abbey when they were traveling around Belgium in April 2012 to be able to sample the beers. This was a great opportunity because the distribution to the US was only the Westvleteren 12 and it sold for $85 a six-pack! At the abbey they tasted not only the Westvleteren 12 but also the 8 and the 10. If you want more than a couple of six-packs then you have to order a case or two by phone and pick them up in a car. The line of cars shows how popular this beer is with folks close enough to drive to the abbey. The phone number and car license cannot be used again for several months so there is a significant limit on how much of the beer an individual can get. Unfortunately, like all of the Trappist abbeys, there are no tours of the brewery.

  • MuchenOktoberfest2012

    MuchenOktoberfest2012

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    Oktoberfest in Muchen, Deutschland (Munich, Germany) is a truly indescribable experience. In September and October 2012, Tim and Beth traveled around Germany for a couple of weeks and ended up in Muchen for the big party. They stayed four nights in one of their favorite hotels, which is just a block from Theresienwiese so it was easy to enjoy the festival. They could walk through on their way to someplace in Muchen, grab a beer and a brat in the evening or make a day of it at one of the tents. Notice that the term “tent” is a bit misleading. These are almost permanent structures with balconies, gazebos, kitchens and lots and lots of people. Some of the larger tents hold over 6,000! Tim and Beth spend most of their first day in the Hacker tent, because Beth’s favorite German beer is Hacker-Pschorr Dunkle Weisse, where they sat with a group of young German students. It’s easy to make new friends when everyone has a one-liter Maß (pronounced ‘mas’), Bavarian for a mug of beer. During the other days they tried to visit each of the other tents just to see how different they all are. Some are huge and others are small, intimate and crowded. But there is more to Oktoberfest than the beer tents. There are rides and games and lots to do for everyone in the family. Staying close also meant that they didn’t get caught in the crowds in the subway at night and it was easy to get to one of the small restaurants before noon for a traditional Bavarian breakfast, Weisswurst and Hefeweizen. Delicious!

  • PintsForProstratesRareBeerTasting2012

    PintsForProstratesRareBeerTasting2012

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    The Pints For Prostrates Rare Beer Tasting is a wonderful event on Friday of GABF. For the 2012 event, thirty-three brewers and 500 beer lovers met upstairs at the Wynkoop Brewing Co. across from Union Station for food, beer, festivities and a good cause. One of the highlights was the anniversary edition of Boston Brewing’s Utopias, a truly unique beer. Every brewer brought something very special. Since most were one-of-a-kind beers it just isn’t possible to even begin to describe this event. You just have to be there!

  • GABF-2012

    GABF-2012

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    At their forth GABF, Tim and Beth only attended the Saturday Members session. They couldn’t get into the swing of things since they just returned from Oktoberfest in Munich, literally the day before GABF! They made their customary stop at the Dogfish Head booth to check out the latest ancient ale recipes from Sam Calagione. This year it was Tim’s turn to get a picture with Sam. They just took things easy and tried not to be too judgmental when trying any of the German style beers.

  • BrauKonCambaBrewery

    BrauKonCambaBrewery

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    The BrauKon Camba Brewery is located a ways outside of Munich, Germany so Time and Beth were able to visit it on the 2013 Oktoberfest trip. This was a special brewery visit because BrauKon is the equipment manufacturer for the new brewhouse at their “local” brewery, Bristol Brewing Co. BrauKon has a full brewery where they can show off all of the different equipment and as a side effect they have some wonderful beers, and unique, for sale. Beth fell in love with the Weizenbock Hell which is a truly unique light wheat bock beer!

  • BristolBrewingCo_TejonSt

    BristolBrewingCo_TejonSt

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    The Tejon Street location was next door to the Blue Star restaurant and the site for many activities at the brewery. One annual event there was the Firkin Rendezvous where brewers from all over Colorado brought a firkin (~8 galons) of some special brew as a fund raiser for the Brewers Guild. Many of these pictures were taken at the last Firkin Rendezvous on Tejon in February 2013. Bristol has moved to the new brewery location, about two blocks away, in the ole Ivywild elementary school building.

  • ProstBrewing

    ProstBrewing

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Prost does classic German beers using a 70-barrel system imported from Germany. Even if you have seen lots of breweries, it is worth the trip to look at the beautiful copper tun and kettle! For their Weissbier they use a special yeast from a brewery in eastern Bavaria that’s not available anywhere else. It has a very remarkable character! They also brew some not so German styles, but with a bit of a German twist, such as Dank IPA that is contract brewed for Dad and Dudes Breweria using a jointly developed recipe.

  • FunkwerksBrewery

    FunkwerksBrewery

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Don't let the brewery name dissuade you from visiting Funkwerks. It is a bit hard to find in an industrial area of Fort Collins but it is worth the trip because there is nothing "funky" about their beers! They offer both true Belgian styles and some with their own twists, like the Oak Aged Apricot Belgian IPA that was on tap the day of our visit. The location hosted three different breweries but now that two have moved to their own locations there is plenty of room for Funkwerks to grow. A “must visit” if you like Belgian style beers!

  • EquinoxBrewing

    EquinoxBrewing

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Located close to Old Town in Fort Collins, Colorado, Equinox Brewing is definitely worth a visit. They have a wide selection of beers in both a standard and a specialty selection, a large comfortable tasting room and a beer garden out back. As an added convenience, next door is a brewing supply shop. For the outdoor types they offer Nalgene growlers that you can take anywhere. Their distribution is limited to just a couple of blocks around the brewery so they build a unique pedal-powered delivery vehicle, complete with built-in keg dolly!

  • GABF-2011

    GABF-2011

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    At their third GABF, Tim and Beth wanted to get even more focused. They had seen how Sam Calagione at Dogfish Head had researched truly ancient ale recipes on the Brew Masters series on Discovery Channel. (A really great but short lived series rumored to have been canceled when one of the big ‘crap’ breweries threatened to pull their advertising. Sad.) Beth got to meet Sam, which psyched her for their upcoming December trip to the east coast where they planned a side trip to Delaware for a tour of the main brewery in Milton and the original brewery in Rehoboth Beach. She also explored Oktoberfest and pumpkin beers. Tim focused on Belgian style ales, especially Belgian IPAs, as research for his home brewing. He found many of the brewers were very willing to talk about which yeast strains they used and what temperatures they fermented at. What a great opportunity!

  • GABF-2010

    GABF-2010

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    For their second GABF, Tim and Beth tried to approach it with more of a plan. Of course Beth wanted to see what was at the Dogfish Head booth after learning more about their ancient ales. She also tried many brown ales and also discovered that she likes the fruit beers. Tim focused on IPAs from regions that they haven’t traveled to yet.

  • AsahiBrewery

    AsahiBrewery

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Asahi is one of the largest breweries in Japan, producing pretty generic lagers (think Bud or Miller). However, right across from the front door to the worldwide headquarters in Tokyo is the Asahi Annex Brewery where they brew some truly fine craft beers. Even their twists on the "standard" Asahi beers were surprisingly good. Asahi bought the Sumida River Brewery (the Sumida river is what the bridge goes over in the CorporateHQ picture) and now brews those craft beers right at the headquarters. The weizen is very true to style and the porter, much lighter than a US or English porter, is well balanced and enjoyable.

  • PikesPeakBrewing

    PikesPeakBrewing

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Pikes Peak Brewing brings craft beer to Monument, CO. Located about 30 minutes north of Colorado Springs, this is a great place to stop for lunch on the way to Denver. Try the Elephant Rock IPA for an almost imperial tast! At 8.8% it isn't a session beer but it is a must for IPA lovers.

  • London_Pubs

    London_Pubs

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    One of the really great things to do in London was to follow Dick Whittington's Ale Trail. Sadly, it seems that the handy map of many really interesting pubs is not available but has been replaced by one from the Nicholsons Pubs group. Here are some of the pubs from that older map. If you get to London it would be worth printing out the new maps from the Nicholsons Ale Trail

  • MagnoliaBrewery

    MagnoliaBrewery

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    This pub and brewery is located in the heart of the Haight-Ashbury area in San Francisco, CA (on Haight and just one block from Ashbury). Take advantage of the great public transportation and enjoy a craft brew or two. Take the 6, 7, 37, 43 or 71 bus to Haight & Masonic; the 33 bus to Haight & Ashbury; or the 21 bus to Hayes & Masonic.

  • RussianRiverBrewing

    RussianRiverBrewing

    Last modified: 9 years ago

    Based on the old saying that "It takes a lot of great beer to make a good wine.", no trip to the Napa wine country would be complete without visiting the jewel of Santa Rosa, CA. Although everyone who reallys knows craft beers can tell you that Russian River is famous for the hallmark of Imperial IPAs, Pliny the Elder, did you know about their Belgian and cask aged beers? There is so much more at the brewery then you will ever see in the stores!

  • BackcountryBrewery

    BackcountryBrewery

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Located in Frisco, Colorado, this brewery is a short drive to Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain and Vail ski areas. What's even better is that the Summit Stage provides transportation between Frisco, Breckenridge and Keystone for free! Ski or hick all day and then enjoy a great local brew without the drive.

  • SteamworksBrewingCo

    SteamworksBrewingCo

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Located just a short walk from the where the cruise ships dock in Vancouver, BC, Canada, this is a great pub for that pre- or post-cruise meal, accompanied by one of their great house beers, of course.

  • BrewHouse

    BrewHouse

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Located in Wistler, BC, Canada, the site of the many of the skiing events for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, the BrewHouse combines craft beer, good food (try their twist on Poutine) and fun (notice the train that runs around the bar and restaurant).

  • GoreRangeBrewery

    GoreRangeBrewery

    Last modified: 10 years ago

    Located in Edwards Colorado, the Gore Range Brewery provides the high country with craft beers. Next time you are staying in Vail take the ECO Bus (Eagle County Transit: http://www.eaglecounty.us/Transit) to the town of Edwards for just $4 each way ($1 for seniors). The ride takes 45-65 minutes from the Vail Transportation Center, depending on the number of stops the bus makes. The buses are comfortable, the scenery enjoyable and you can have a sampler and a beer or two without worrying about the drive back.